Observing Notices

Followup: Transit of Mercury, November 11, 2019

Congratulations to all who were able to observe and image this transit. The next Mercury transit available to even more observers in the western hemisphere won’t be until May 7, 2049.

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The image here is part of a video clip posted on the ALPO Facebook page by ALPO Solar Section Assistant Coordinator Pam Shivak: “Check out this awesome video our friend Claude Plymate posted taken from the Big Bear Solar Observatory of the Mercury Transit! Claude is the Chief telescope operator there! (That facility is located approximately 120 kilometers (75 miles) east of downtown Los Angeles, California USA.)

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“Claude writes ‘Here is the “quick look’ video of the transit of Mercury from Big Bear Solar Observatory. These observations were taken with a PCO-2000 CCD with 2ms exposures though a 10a wide filter centered at 7057A. The field of view is 70×70″. Hopefully, we can get the data processed and put out a much better version soon. Please keep in mind that these are completely raw, unprocessed images.”

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The actual video can be accessed at https://www.facebook.com/pamela.shivak/videos/10220329722894095/?t=0

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PLEASE send your reports and images to Keith Spring, who is the acting assistant coordinator of the ALPO Mercury/Venus Transit Section. Keith can be reached at:

2173 John Hart Circle

Orange Park, FL 32073

Email star.man13@hotmail.com

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Comet Activity for November

November finds us in-between bright comets. C/2018 W2 (Africano) is now too faint for small aperture telescopes while C/2017 T2 (PANSTARRS) is at least a month away from becoming an easy object. Fortunately it will continue to brighten over the next few months and should provide a nice target for much of the first half of 2020. CCD imagers are encouraged to keep a detector on interstellar comet 2I/Borisov which will be around 15-16th magnitude this month.

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Other comets brighter than 13th magnitude this month include 29P/Schwassmann-Wachmann, 260P/McNaught, and C/2018 N2 (ASASSN). Fainter comets of interest include 289P/Blanpain and the aforementioned 2I/Borisov.

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The monthly ALPO Comet News PDF can be found here. An edited version of this report is posted on the Cloudy Nights forum at (https://www.cloudynights.com/topic/682477-alpo-comet-news-for-november-2019/). Everyone is invited to join the discussion at our Cloudy Nights forum.

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Carl Hergenrother
Coordinator, ALPO Comets Section Coordinator

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Expected Meteor Activity (posted November 18, 2019)

This post discusses the possibility of a short meteor outburst on the night of November 21/22, 2019.

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To access the article click on: Alpha Monocerotid Outburst in 2019?

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We welcome hourly reports on meteor activity at: lunro.imo.usa@cox.net

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Reports of individual fireballs should be filled out at: https://fireball.amsmeteors.org/members/imo/report_intro/

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Meteor Activity Outlooks for observers in the southern hemisphere are available upon request at: lunro.imo.usa@cox.net

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Clear Skies!.

Robert Lunsford
ALPO Meteors Section Coordinator

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Notes About Lunar Domes Luther and Hall

Two lunar domes located near the craters Luther and Hall (which we termed Luth1 and Hall1), have been imaged and studied.

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The morphometric characteristics of these domes have been examined by making use of a combined photoclinometry and shape from shading approach and Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter (LRO) WAC images, including th LOLA DEM data set. A full spectral analysis based on Chandrayaan-1 Moon Mineralogy Mapper is in progress.

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The ALPO Lunar Domes Studies Program encourages all to participate by submitting more high-resolution imagery of this wide lunar region so that we can have more data to identify further lunar domes not yet characterized in the morphometric and spectral properties.

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The preliminary report can be found at http://www.alpo-astronomy.org/lunarblog/wp-content/uploads/2019/11/domesLuther-Hall.pdf

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Raffaello Lena
Coordinator, ALPO Lunar Domes Studies Program


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Publications Section Bulletin

Are you looking to see if the ALPO ever covered a special solar system event that you remember? Does your current research require specific solar system observational data by the amateur astronomy community? Click Here to go to JALPO Indexes

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