Lunar Section        

 
 

April 1, 2020

The Lunar Observer April 2020

In the April 2020 issue of The Lunar Observer, amateur astronomers from across the globe continue to submit outstanding drawings, images, and articles about our nearest neighbor in space. Because of the Covid-19 outbreak and many people locked down, the number of observations is down some from previous months. Hopefully, people can continue to get out some to do some lunar observing. Be careful and safe out there!

Robert Hayes Jr. takes us on a tour of the Fauth area while Alberto Anunziato and Sergio Babino explore the Tycho area. Read this and find a new “Lunar X”! David Teske had a nice look towards the far-side of the Moon in an article about the crater Bailly and beyond. As always, Tony Cook presented an interesting look at Lunar Geologic Change. Plus, as said above, many spectacular images of the Moon are presented in the Recent Topographic Studies. Looking ahead, check out the ALPO conference details this coming November.

Find the April 2020 The Lunar Observer here.

Be safe,

David Teske
Acting Coordinator, Lunar Topographic Studies Program
Assn of Lunar & Planetary Observers

 
 

February 29, 2020

The Lunar Observer March 2020

The March 2020 issue of The Lunar Observer, newsletter of the ALPO Lunar Topographical Studies & Selected Areas Program, and the Lunar Geological Change program is available at http://moon.scopesandscapes.com/tlo. Back issues are also available at http://moon.scopesandscapes.com. As always, thanks so much for the contributors and readers of The Lunar Observer. In the March 2020 issue, we have some rather remarkable articles. Jerry Hubbell concludes is Focus-On section of the ALPO selected regions craters with a discussion of Tycho and Herodotus. Robert H. Hays Jr. brings a timely and very nice article and drawing of Herodotus. Alberto Anunziato gives us two articles. The first is an article and drawing about Hipparchus C. The second is a fascinating historical research about an event on the Moon seen in 577. This was the first LTP ever listed. Darryl Wilson continues his thermal imaging articles with an article about Thermal Imaging of Tycho. His articles of thermal imaging have stirred up much interest lately. The Gardner Megadome is a very interesting area of the Moon to observe. It is the subject of two in-depth articles by Howard Eskildsen and Raffaello Lena. Rik Hill and David Teske continue their wanderings of a remarkable lunar moonscape with images and articles. Sixteen observers contributed articles to the Recent Topographic Studies Program. Tony Cook as always has contributed an interesting article about Lunar Geologic Change. Thanks again to all who contributed. I hope that you can get out and enjoy some wonderful moon observations.

If the link above doesn’t work for you, try typing it directly into your browser. If that doesn’t work, reply (NOT reply all) to this email and I’ll send you a copy by mail.

David Teske
Acting Coordinator, Lunar Topographic Studies Program
Assn of Lunar & Planetary Observers

 
 

January 31, 2020

February 2020 The Lunar Observer

The February 2020 issue of The Lunar Observer, newsletter of the ALPO Lunar Topographical Studies & Selected Areas Program, and the Lunar Geological Change program is available by clicking here. Back issues are also available at http://moon.scopesandscapes.com. In the February 2020 issue of The Lunar Observer, before telling what is in this issue, look at who is in this issue. Contributions were received from 22 observers in 7 countries! I am thrilled that we are reaching that many lunar observers. In this issue you will find articles about the craters Galle and Clausius by Robert Hayes Jr., the crater Nöggerath by Alberto Anunziato, lunar domes in the Maraldi D region by Raffaello Lena, Maximilian Teodorescu and Jim Phillips, a discussion of whether Bliss, (formally Plato A) is a banded crater by Alberto Anunziato and Francisco A. Cardinalli, an in depth look at a light cone in the crater Hesiodus and discussions of lunar landscapes by Rik Hill, Howard Eskildsen and David Teske. The pages are graced by many stunning lunar drawings and images, all taken by amateur astronomers. Tony Cook provide another thorough look at lunar geologic change. Enjoy and have fun observing our nearest neighbor in space.

If the link above doesn’t work for you, try typing it directly into your browser. If that doesn’t work, reply (NOT reply all) to this email and I’ll send you a copy by mail.

David Teske
Acting Coordinator, Lunar Topographic Studies Program
Assn of Lunar & Planetary Observers

 
 

January 07, 2020

Lunar Domes near Maraldi D:
a preliminary report

Eight lunar domes, located near the crater Maraldi D in the northern region of the Cauchy shield, have been imaged and studied. The morphometric characteristics of these domes have been examined by making use of a combined photoclinometry and shape from shading approach and Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter (LRO) WAC image, including LOLA DEM data set. The domes are named C35-C42.Thus during our lunar domes survey (thirteen years, since 2006) we have classified a total of fifty-six domes in the wide Cauchy shield. click here for the preliminary report
A full spectral analysis based on Chandrayaan-1 Moon Mineralogy Mapper is in progress. The Lunar Domes section encourages more high-resolution imagery of this wide lunar region so that we can have more data to identify further lunar domes not characterized in the morphometric and spectral properties yet.
Raffaello Lena
Coordinator, Lunar Domes Program
Assn of Lunar and Planetary Observers

 
 

January 02, 2020

January 2020 The Lunar Observer available

The January 2020 issue of The Lunar Observer, newsletter of the ALPO Lunar Topographical Studies & Selected Areas Program, and the Lunar Geological Change program is available at http://www.alpo-astronomy.org/lunarblog/wp-content/uploads/2020/01/tlo-january.pdf. Back issues are also available at http://moon.scopesandscapes.com. In the January 2020 issue of The Lunar Observer, you will find an extensive Focus-On article about craters Plato and Theophilus by Jerry Hubbell. Rik Hill covers some complicated regions of the lunar highlands with his four articles and stunning images. Howard Eskildsen continues his research and imaging of lunar domes near Vitruvius and Cauchy, Kies, Gambart, Capuanus and Lansberg D. David Teske delves into the area near Billy and Flamsteed with a whimsical character. Tony Cook presents another thorough article about lunar change. As always, several observers contributed many sharp images for our recent topographic studies. Tours of the lunar topography are presented in short articles, drawings, and images throughout this issue. Enjoy and have fun observing our nearest neighbor in space.

If the link above doesn’t work for you, try typing it directly into your browser. If that doesn’t work, reply (NOT reply all) to this email and I’ll send you a copy by mail.

David Teske
Acting Coordinator, Lunar Topographic Studies Program
Assn of Lunar & Planetary Observers

 
 

December 4, 2019

December 2019 TLO is available

The December 2019 issue of The Lunar Observer, newsletter of the ALPO Lunar Topographical Studies & Selected Areas Program, and the Lunar Geological Change program is available by clicking here. Back issues are also available at http://moon.scopesandscapes.com.
In the December 2019 The Lunar Observer look for some interesting articles about lunar domes, both from the Raffaello Lena, Carmelo Zannelli, Maximilian Teodorescu and Jim Phillips article about lunar domes near the craters Hall and Luther along with several images and articles about domes from Howard Eskildsen. John Sabia takes us on a tour of the Moon with a 9.5-inch Alvin Clark refractor, though Damian Peach’s image of Plato through a 1 m telescope is also quite the view. Sounds like dream telescopes for such a purpose. As always, Tony Cook provides an engaging article about lunar geologic change. Tours of the lunar topography are presented in short articles, drawings, and images throughout this issue. Enjoy and have fun observing our nearest neighbor in space.
David Teske
Acting Coordinator, Lunar Topographic Studies Program
Assn of Lunar & Planetary Observers

 
 

November 10, 2019

Domes Luther and Hall

Two lunar domes, located near the craters Luther and Hall (which we termed Luth1 and Hall1), have been imaged and studied.
The morphometric characteristics of these domes have been examined by making use of a combined photoclinometry and shape from shading approach and Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter (LRO) WAC image, including LOLA DEM data set. A full spectral analysis based on Chandrayaan-1 Moon Mineralogy Mapper is in progress.
The Lunar Domes section encourages more high-resolution imagery of this wide lunar region so that we can have more data to identify further lunar domes not characterized in the morphometric and spectral properties yet.
Please click here to read the preliminary report.

Raffaello Lena
Coordinator, Lunar Domes Program
Assn of Lunar and Planetary Observers

 
 

November 2, 2019

November 2019 TLO available

The November 2019 issue of The Lunar Observer, newsletter of the ALPO Lunar Topographical Studies & Selected Areas Program, and the Lunar Geological Change program is available by clicking here. Back issues are also available at http://moon.scopesandscapes.com. This issue contains several contributed articles including: Focus-On article about the lunar craters Atlas and Copernicus, thermal imaging of the Moon, domes in the Sinus Iridum region, several short articles about various lunar features, images from several observers and a report from the Lunar Geologic Change Detection Program.
If the link above doesn’t work for you, try typing it directly into your browser. If that doesn’t work reply (NOT reply all) to this email and I’ll send you a copy by email.

David Teske
Acting Coordinator, Lunar Topographic Studies Program
Assn of Lunar & Planetary Observers

 
 

October 1, 2019

October 2019 TLO available

The October 2019 issue of The Lunar Observer, newsletter of the ALPO Lunar Topographical Studies & Selected Areas Program, and the Lunar Geological Change program is available by clicking here. Back issues are also available at http://moon.scopesandscapes.com. This issue includes several contributed articles including an article comparing an oblique impact crater on the Moon with an oblique impact crater in Argentina, images from several observers and a report from the Lunar Geologic Change Detection Program.

If the link above doesn’t work for you, try typing it directly into your browser. If that doesn’t work, send me an email and I’ll send you a copy by return email.

David Teske
Acting Coordinator, Lunar Topographic Studies Program
Assn of Lunar & Planetary Observers

 
 

October 12, 2019

Image request for lunar dome in Promontorium Laplace

A lunar dome in Promontorium Laplace has been imaged by Maximilian Teodorescu from Romania. The excellent CCD terrestrial image taken by Teodorescu, under oblique solar illumination, displays the dome termed La 1 very well, demonstrating as high resolution CCD imagery of the elusive lunar domes is useful for the recognition of non-cataloged domes.
The Lunar Domes section encourages more high-resolution imagery of this area. Please click here to read the preliminary note of the dome near Promontorium Laplace, including a description of the spectral analyses.

Raffaello Lena
Coordinator, Lunar Domes Program
Assn of Lunar and Planetary Observers

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